Monday, March 31, 2008

ORQUIDEORAMA - Botanical Garden

Photos and information on the Orquideorama Botanical Garden in Medellin Colombia via inhabitat.com


Medellin, Colombia, Plan B Architects, Orquideorama, sustainable wood, responsibly managed forests, sustainable architecture, green architecture, green design, cellular architecture, botanical garden, Jardín Botánico de Medellí, Felipe Mesa, Alexander Bernal, Orquideorama4Medellin, Colombia, Plan B Architects, Orquideorama, sustainable wood, responsibly managed forests, cellular architecture, sustainable architecture, green architecture, green design, botanical garden, Jardín Botánico de Medellí, Felipe Mesa, Alexander Bernal, Orquideorama3
Medellin, Colombia, Plan B Architects, Orquideorama, sustainable wood, responsibly managed forests, cellular architecture, sustainable architecture, green architecture, green design, botanical garden, Jardín Botánico de Medellí, Felipe Mesa, Alexander Bernal, Orquideorama7
Medellin, Colombia, Plan B Architects, Orquideorama, sustainable wood, responsibly managed forests, cellular architecture, sustainable architecture, green architecture, green design, botanical garden, Jardín Botánico de Medellí, Felipe Mesa, Alexander Bernal, orq1.jpg

Architects Felipe Mesa and Alexander Bernal wanted the Orquideorama to grow in the same way that a garden seeds and develops, with one “flor-árbol” popping up next to another. This lead them to design the installation as a series of interconnected modular structures (14 in all) specialized for a variety of functions including event halls, butterfly reserves, and flower gardens. Fittingly, this repetitious cellular weave resonates with another organic structure: honeycomb.

Each “flor-árbol” is composed of a steel reinforced trunk and six hexagonal petals that form an intricately latticed patio. The plants situated beneath each trunk are sustained via rainwater collected by the petals, and are protected from the elements by the translucent pine wood weave that is sourced from reforested lands. Taken as a whole, the Orquideorama is a delicate display of the relationship and structural similarities between architecture and living organisms.

+ Plan B
+ Jardín Botánico de Medellí




Wednesday, March 26, 2008

Sustainable Skyscraper Symbiosis

Via Inhabitat.com: Daekwon Parks' sustainable skyscraper project. Full post here.

eVolo Architecture, Daekwon Park, Symbiotic Interlock, skyscraper competition, new design, architecture, sustainable design, eVolo, prefabricated housing, wind power, future architecture, Sustainable Building, daekwonpark1.jpg
Now in its fourth year running, the eVolo Skyscraper Competition takes future-forward architecture to its breaking point, unveiling a stunning array of new structural concepts by architects, engineers, and designers. The latest crop of entries is up, and Daekwon Park’s Symbiotic Interlock goes far beyond the standard skyscraper to envision a total renovation of inner-city infrastructure. The pitch: it’s modular, prefabricated, and completely symbiotic on the existing vertical infrastructure of the city.

eVolo Architecture, Daekwon Park, Symbiotic Interlock, skyscraper competition, new design, architecture, sustainable design, eVolo, prefabricated housing, wind power, future architecture, Sustainable Building, daekwonpark2.jpg

Skyscrapers are one of the modern city’s most ideologically charged structures. Dominating the skyline, they captivate and articulate a wealth of ideals while anchoring a city’s social fabric. As the world’s population increases and cities stretch to accommodate it, these structures will become increasingly important in sustaining this massive influx. Out of necessity, they will have to evolve. eVolo Architecture was founded in 2003 by a group of international architects in NYC and hosts a yearly contest dedicated to rethinking the skyscraper in radical new ways. The only requirement: “Designs must be technologically feasible and environmentally responsible.”

Daekwon Park created Symbiotic Interlock “to reunite the isolated city blocks and insert a multi-layer network of public space, green space and nodes for the city”. It comprises a system of stackable modules that are designed to add an extra layer of infrastructure to existing buildings via sky docks and bridges, vertical gardens, cultural spaces, and energy producing wind turbines. It addresses some of the shortcomings of green roofs by internalizing green environments within its biomorphic structure while contributing functionality, energy, and food. It may not have beaten the competition, but its symbiotic integration with existing buildings struck us as a brilliant brand of future-forward thinking within the present era.

+ evolo-arch.com

Green energy



The Times has a special section this week on the business of sustainability. Above, columns of algae being grown for biofuel by Solena in Alicante, Spain. The section includes articles on green collar jobs, business going carbon neutral or carbon negative, Sun Edison the solar panel provider, etc. 


Tuesday, March 25, 2008

museum of nature



check out this photographer's "preservation" project

Saturday, March 22, 2008

Expo 2008 in Zaragoza, Spain


Concept video for the 2008 Expo in Zaragoza with the theme of sustainability and water.



Digital Water Pavilion at Zaragoza

Friday, March 14, 2008

Wednesday, March 12, 2008

Project New Orleans

http://www.project-neworleans.org/index.html

Blog of student projects dealing with New Orleans in several topics (housing, urbanism, etc). Nice and interesting work. Methinks Team CF should contact them after the semester to add our stuff ;-)